Visit to Ojukheon and Gangneung Seongyojang Houses

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Me standing in front of the gate of Ojukheon House

The other day we stopped and visited two different famous restored (hanoks, or traditional Korean houses). The first was Ojukheon [오죽헌] and the linked municipal museum. The second was Gangneung Seongyojang House [강릉 선교장], one of the best maintained Joseon Dynasty residences in Korea. View full post »

Achraf from Morocco - Nice job Cara, I like the job you’ve done already in this website … keep writing!

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Korean Cooking Class

Another extracurricular that I signed up for was the Korean cooking class. We spent last Saturday in Cheongju at a cooking workshop. I could go into detail on what we made and how we made it, but that would take too long. So here’s some photos and links to the recipes instead.

We made typical kimbap (Korean-style vegetable sushi) and pajeon (vegetable pancakes) with squid. It was delicious. Yay delicious food!!! We thoroughly enjoyed the break from Jungwon’s sub-par cafeteria food.

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The chefs:)

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Who is teaching who? – FEP teaching tales

This past Friday was the last day of FEP (Fulbright English Program), the two week summer camp where students from all over Korean could do an English immersion program and us ETAs could have the opportunity to have some teaching practice.

There was a lot of preparation that went into this. We had only two classes to teach during FEP. We were given a different class each time, with each day being a different theme. The classes were ranked by English ability, not age. This was both good and bad as it made it easier to teach to that specific level of English, but it also meant that we could have a more advanced elementary student with a high schooler in the same class, which maturity and age difference posed its own challenges. View full post »

Dad - It would be hard for anyone teaching a group,with such disparate developmental
Needs and stages. Having 1 or 2 socio -emotional children will also challenge youGet control right away as the kids will test who is in control. You will learning something new every day and that is a good thing. The Clue game was brilliant .

How to Pack for Teaching in South Korea » Cara Mooney Photography - […] you’ll need at least one formal professional outfit, a teaching outfit for when you teach at FEP, and conservative campus wear for Jungwon (as in even more conservative than normal Korea). This […]

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The Food of Jungwon

If you haven’t seen some of my previous posts where I complain about the Korean cafeteria food here at Jungwon, I have decided to compile all the photos I have taken of my various meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner). I am sure you cannot not the difference between which meals are breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Trust me, there is no difference.

The staple items are rice, kimchi, and some sort of soup with a few other side dishes changing every meal. I thought that at another school that the meals might be a little different, but I was disappointed to find out that all school meals seem to follow this pattern. When I visited the high school and ate lunch there, it was almost exactly the same thing I eat at Jungwon, except the trays were different. So much for getting a break from the food…

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Quail eggs, fish soup, yogurt, rice & kimchi

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Korean Cooking Class » Cara Mooney Photography - […] We made typical kimbap (Korean-style vegetable sushi) and pajeon (vegetable pancakes) with squid. It was delicious. Yay delicious food!!! We thoroughly enjoyed the break from Jungwon’s sub-par cafeteria food. […]

Dad - So , do you want me to send you some Pirates Booty candy?😊😊 The watermelon looked ok?

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Fulbright Placement Ceremony

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So big news, everyone!!! Today we had our Placement Ceremony where all of us would find out where we will be sent after Orientation has ended. There has been a lot of anticipation leading up to this and we only just found out two days ago that we would have our Placement Ceremony tonight.

What makes the  Fulbright Korea special is that it is not only of the Fulbright’s largest and flagship programs, it is one of the only Fulbright programs (to my knowledge) that does not disclose where you will be located right away. There is also a unique 6 week-long Orientation, during which you go through rigorous language and cultural training. During Orientation we submitted forms listing preferences and other pertinent information to be considered for our school placements. It is during this Placement Ceremony that we are given information that many of of my other Fulbright friends have known for a long while, even before they left the USA. People kept asking me where I would be in Korea, and I had no answer. Well now I do! View full post »

Terry Mooney - Good luck to all on your new adventure.

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Hiking in Seoraksan National Park

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The summit of Ulsanbawi, Seoraksan National Park

This past weekend we had a retreat from our normal orientation at Jungwon University and took a bus north to the city of Sokcho (previous post). The city is only a 20 minute bus ride from the famous, Seoraksan National Park, one of Korea’s more famous national parks. Having the opportunity to do some great hiking, a number of us decided to get up early and hit the trails. The trail that a few friends and I decided upon was a 4-5 hour hike up the popular Ulsanbawi (Rock) Section 우란바위.

Ulsanbawi is a fairly easy hike until you reach the near-vertical section. However, there are a number of temples along the way. This includes the famous temple underneath a large bolder that faces the moving rock. Hikers can stand in front of the large bolder and push, feeling it shift and rock under your fingers. It’s a strange sensation, and makes you wonder if the bolder will eventually fall and roll away, but people have been doing this for years. They were doing it too the last time I was here in Korea. View full post »

Hiking Mudeungsan » Cara Mooney Photography - […] ruined a number of weeks for me during peak hiking season! To date the only mountain I hiked was Ulsanbawi (Ulsan rock) in Seoraksan National Park back when I first came to […]

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Weekend in Sokcho!!!

This past weekend we had a retreat from our normal orientation at Jungwon University and took a bus north to the city of Sokcho. It is in the northern coastal city known for its fresh fish and mountains that makes up Korea’s famous, Seoraksan National Park.

Buddhist Temple

We had the opportunity to get a semi-private tour through a restored Buddhist temple and eat dinner there. After a short walk in, we were greeted by a monk who showed us around. The monk was a very interesting fellow. Very un-monklike actually. At least very different from what my perception of what a monk would be like. He was very chill and funny, breaking out into song on occasion and joking around with all of us. View full post »

Hiking in Seoungrak National Park » Cara Mooney Photography - […] had a retreat from our normal orientation at Jungwon University and took a bus north to the city of Sokcho (previous post). The city is only a 20 minute bus ride from the famous, Seoraksan National Park, […]

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Soccer, Taekwondo, and Other Clubs

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#FulbrightSwag [Photo credit: Grace Lee for surprising me with this great photo]

The weather in Goesan is hit or miss. Apparently it is monsoon season in South East Asia and we are getting some of that too. So far there has been two entirely sunny days with most of the time being overcast or rainy. Interestingly enough, although it is has been raining, it doesn’t feel dreary. The surrounding mountains even when enshrouded in fog look beautiful and mysterious. The few sunny days we’ve had have been used to play some sports outside.

Soccer

Early into our first week we had gotten a census of how many people were interested in playing soccer. Somehow, I ended up being the person to organize everything, suggesting one afternoon that we go outside and play. I haven’t played soccer in almost four years, and I think I had forgotten how much fun it was. The game we played was a highlight of my week. I was pleasantly surprised with the amount of skill I have retained from all the years of soccer training. I was also worried that some people might be too intense, especially the guys, (as in my experience in college, playing co-ed at this age can be a little rough), but everyone was very respectful of people’s skills and limitations. This was not to say it did not get intense at times, or that a there were not a few scrapes and bruises. No one was outright aggressive like they were at college, taking advantage of another player’s inexperience in soccer or shoving people out of the way. We’re trying to get more games together and seeing where they fit in between intensive language class and other workshops and teacher training.

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Fulbright Ultimate Frisbee / Soccer Club — Bring it on!!!

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Dad - Love your post about the soccer. You are pretty intense too.It is not suprizing to me you “happen” to be the one organizing the game. You are leader, like that guys told you years ago at Goose Rocks Beach. Wonerful to see you and hear you are doing well.. Luv you

mom - Glad you are having so much fun! Is anyone playing music?

School Festival at Bongsung » Cara Mooney Photography - […] hours to go around and check out all the games. There were also games set up outside and an ongoing soccer game, which I totally got in on. There were also snack […]

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